Sustain Our State (SOS) Rally

Linn Park, Downtown Birmingham

Conservation Groups and concerned citizens call on elected officials

to assure healthy, clean water and air and real public transit.

 

 

Birmingham – Stateand local civic and conservation organizations and citizens are calling on Alabama legislators to Sustain Our State by assuring healthy, clean water and air and real public transit. We call for actionable, implementable (1) water (2) energy and (3) public transportation policies and plans now to assure this sustainable future. 1-2-3 GO!  

The SOS Rally takes place at Linn Park Tuesday, August 16. Starting at 1:00 PM, featured speakers discuss clean water (Cindy Lowry, Alabama Rivers Alliance), air/energy  (Michael Churchman, Alabama Environmental Council) and real transit  (Peter Behrman, Birmingham Jefferson County Transit Authority).

Participants are making and carrying posters, decorating a DART trolley, signing the Clean Air Promise(found on back) and to sending letters(sample found on back) to our state leaders to express our views on the need for policies that ensure a sustainable future for all Alabamians. Rally participants include United Methodist Women from all over the U.S. in Birmingham for their National Social Justice Training Seminar.

Organizations hosting the rally include the Alabama Environmental Council, Alabama Rivers Alliance, GASP, Coalition of Alabama Students for the Environment (CASE), Greater Birmingham Ministries, the League of Women Voters of Alabama and Greater Birmingham and Metro Birmingham Branch NAACP.  Sponsors have information available for attendees. 

Cindy Lowry, executive director of the Alabama Rivers Alliance said, “Clean air and water and transit impact public health and jobs as well as the environment. We have a wealth of natural resources in our state, and it is our duty to protect them for future generations.” 

Michael Churchman, executive director of the Alabama Environmental Council said, “We are asking our state leaders to take a proactive approach to air, energy, water, transit – all elements that are necessary components of sustainable living and stewardship of the environment. We must look at who we are impacting today and plan how our impacts will affect the future.”

Kirsten Bryant, executive director of GASP said, “The most heavily impacted are the poorest and the youngest in our communities - those who are our future. They are the most exposed to unhealthy air and water and least able get to education, jobs, health care and daily necessities. We’re called to address environmental and intergenerational justice.”  

Hezekiah Jackson, president of the Birmingham Metro Branch NAACP said, “It is our duty to improve the quality of life for the disenfranchised and victimized. In order to do this, we must address the protection of air and water as well as the necessity for adequately funded and reliable transportation.”

Rev. Anthony "Alann" Johnson, Community Relations Director, Birmingham Metro Chapter NAACP said, “God made enough of everything to sustain the human race. As leaders, it is incumbent upon us to teach our children to be stewards of our earth’s precious resources to sustain current and future generations."

Ida Tyree Hyche, President, League of Women Voters of Greater Birmingham said, "The League of Women Voters believes that natural resources should be managed as interrelated parts of life-supporting ecosystems. Certainly, we must conserve and protect clean air and water to assure future availability. We must control pollution of our natural resources in order to preserve the physical, chemical and biological integrity of ecosystems and protect public health."

Scott Douglas, executive director Greater Birmingham Ministries said, “In sustaining Alabama, leadership matters. Alabama legislators can support improving access to jobs and deliver more protection of our environment by providing leadership in planning for clean air, clean water, and effective public transportation across rural and urban Alabama.”  

Dr. Kathryn Byrd, State President of the League of Women Voters of Alabama said, “Certainly we hope for economic growth and development in the state of Alabama. However, if our leaders do not give proper consideration to the public health issues as they relate to economic growth and development, then we are paying too high a price for so-called progress.”

 

Clean Air Promise (www.peoplenotpolluters.org):

I promise to protect America's children and families from dangerous air pollution. Because toxics and pollutants such as mercury, smog, carbon, and  soot, cause thousands of hospital visits, asthma attacks, and even deaths. I will support clean air policies and other protections that scientists and public health experts have recommended to the EPA to safeguard our air quality.

 

Sample Letters to State Leaders:

I am joining with voices from the Alabama Environmental Council, Alabama Rivers Alliance, GASP, Coalition of Alabama Students for the Environment (CASE), Greater Birmingham Ministries, the League of Women Voters of Alabama, the League of Women Voters of Birmingham, the Greater Birmingham and Metro Birmingham Branch NAACP to ask you, as a key decision-maker of Alabama, to Sustain Our State by assuring healthy, clean water and air and real public transit.

We are asking for your leadership in developing actionable, implementable (1) water (2) energy and (3) public transportation policies and plans now to assure this sustainable future. Alabamians deserve to know that our water and air are going to be clean, healthy, and abundant for future generations. 

The time is now to plan for a healthy and sustainable state. Thank you for your time and leadership in making this happen. SOS!